American anti-slavery almanac, for 1839

... calculated for New York; adapted to the northern and middle states

Publisher: Published for the American Anti-Slavery Society in New York

Written in English
Published: Pages: 48 Downloads: 415
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Subjects:

  • Almanacs, American -- New York,
  • Antislavery movements -- United States

Edition Notes

ContributionsAmerican Anti-Slavery Society
The Physical Object
Pagination48 p. :
Number of Pages48
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14988884M

The Online Books Page. Online Books by. American Anti-Slavery Society. A Wikipedia article about this author is available.. American Anti-Slavery Society: The Anti-Slavery History of the John-Brown Year: Being the Twenty-Seventh Annual Report of the American Anti-Slavery Society (with two distinct title pages; New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, ) (multiple formats at Google). [] Thirteenth annual report of the American and Foreign Anti-slavery Society: presented at New-York, with the addresses and resolutions, The by American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society. available in print [] Speech of Wendell Phillips, at the Melodeon, Thursday evening, Jan. 27, by Phillips, Wendell, A selection of runaway slave advertisements from The American Anti-Slavery Almanac, A selection of runaway slave advertisements from The American Anti-Slavery Almanac, At least two of the runaway slave advertisements specifically note the light complexions of the enslaved men who allegedly ran away. User Review - Flag as inappropriate This collection of American history by Theodore Dwight Weld (Anti Slavery Society), American slavery as it is: Testimony of a thousand witnesses, has been preserved to capture the imaginations of future generations that we never forget our indivisible Creedal ideas and slip again into criminal greed, moral ignorance,material insensitivity and absence of mind Reviews: 1.

Less a political campaign than a public relations initiative, pamphlets such the American Anti-Slavery Almanac, for helped to spread the word. By , the story of Prudence Crandall had become one of many outrages that the abolitionist press would tell and retell to a growing audience of readers. Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. Published simultaneously in New York and in Philadelphia at the office of the Pennsylvania Anti-slavery Society,. Editors: N.P. Rogers, ; Lydia M. Child, The American anti-slavery almanac, for .. WORLD YALE BRBL. The New York journal of commerce. WORLD. Third in a series of anti-slavery almanacs edited and published in Boston by Nathaniel Southard from to The almanac contains much anti-slavery content and is distinguished by a cover illustration plus 13 illustration cuts depicting the horror and cruelties of slavery. Southard’s introductory essay which declares “SLAVERY HAS MUCH TO DO WITH US” is preceded by an explanation of.   Three American Abolitionist Publications to include: two issues of Genius of Universal Emancipation (Philadelphia: Benjamin Lundy, April and May ), nos. , pages and , pages (9 x 6 in.), this Quaker publication does not hold back any punches, its masthead quoting the Declaration of Independence that "all men are created equal."; plus,The American Anti-Slavery Almanac .

American anti-slavery almanac, for New York: Published for the American Anti-Slavery Society, Notes: Illustration in the American Anti-Slavery Almanac, for (New York: Published for the American Anti-Slavery Society, ), p. Fels Afro-Americana Image Project, Anti-Slavery Movement Imagery. Subject. "American Anti-Slavery Almanac for " The Henry Ford Dearborn, MI, United States. Beginning in the s, some people began to speak out against slavery. Most of these "abolitionists" were white Northerners who had never actually come in contact with enslaved people. Identifier: americanantislavchil Title: The American anti-slavery almanac, for : calculated for Boston, New York, and Pittsburgh.. Year: (s) Authors: Child, Lydia Maria, Child, David Lee, Gay, S. Howard. inscriber Southard, Nathaniel American Almanac Collection (Library of Congress) DLC American Anti-Slavery Society Subjects: Slavery Almanacs, American Views: K. AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC, FOR , Being the second after Bissextile or Leap-Year, and the 62nd of American Independence. Adapted to most parts of the United States. "Thus saith the Lord, Execute judgment in the MORNING, and deliver him that is spoiled out of the hand of the oppressor." N. SOUTHARD, EDITOR. BOSTON: PUBLISHED BY ISAAC.

American anti-slavery almanac, for 1839 Download PDF EPUB FB2

The American anti-slavery almanac, for being the third after leap-year, and the 63d of American independence: calculated for New York: adapted to the northern and middle states by Author: American Anti-Slavery Society. The American anti-slavery almanac, for being the third after bissextile or leap-year, and the 63d of American independence: Calculated for Boston: adapted to the New England states Paperback – January 1, New from.

Used from. Paperback, January 1, Author: American Anti-Slavery Society. The American anti-slavery almanac, for Summary Title page. Created / Published [?] Notes - This record contains unverified, old data from caption card. Medium 1 print.

American Anti-Slavery Almanac, forpp. 13, Abolitionists of the s opposed slavery for moral reasons and called for the immediate end to the institution; however, they believed that immediate abolition could be achieved through moral suasion, persuading.

American Anti-Slavery Society The American anti-slavery almanac, for High-resolution images are available to schools and libraries via subscription to American History, Check to see if your school or library already has a subscription.

The American anti-slavery almanac, for : calculated for Boston, New York, and Pittsburgh. Title from cover Imprint varies:Boston: N. Southard & D.K. Hitchcock;Boston: I. Knapp;New York & Boston: Published for the American Anti-slavery Society; New York: S.W.

Benedict; Boston: I. Knapp; Excerpt from The American Anti-Slavery Almanac, forVol. 1: Being the Third After Bissextile or Leap-Year, and the 63d of American Independence, Calculated for Boston, Adapted to the New England States Ina free colored coachman, wh0se wife was confined, started to go for a midwife.

37 John 39 William abolish abolition abolitionism abolitionists American American Anti-Slavery Society Anti-Slavery Almanac Aphelion Apogee Bloomingburg Boston Calvary Morris Carried chain child church citizens Clay Colonization Society column Cong Congress contented and happy Cumberland River election emancipated favor Florida free colored freedom Full Moon George Henry Henry Clay.

On the cover of the first American Anti-Slavery Almanac from the yearan illustration (above) presents a pleasant image of an African family freed from slavery. It is unclear if this is a free black family now back in Africa, or if this is an African family who never faced slavery.

By The American Anti-Slavery Society; ; Isaac Knapp, Boston. First published in by the American Anti-Slavery Society, the American Anti-Slavery Almanac was an attempt to bring awareness about slavery to nineteenth-century America. Collection History. This digital compilation was developed in support of the NYPL website, "The African American Migration Experience," a sweeping year historical narrative from the transatlantic slave trade to the Western migration, the colonization movement, the Great Migration, and the contemporary immigration of Caribbeans, Haitians, and sub-Saharan Africans.

The American Anti−Slavery Almanac, for (Boston: Isaac Knapp), 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, Edited by Old Sturbridge Village. Primary links. The American Anti-Slavery Almanac was published yearly by the American Anti-Slavery Society beginning in as one of the Society's efforts to raise awareness of the realities of slavery in nineteenth century America.

The yearly almanac compiled calendars and astronomical data with anti-slavery literature, art, and advertisements. A major means of publicizing such images were the Almanacs that the American Anti-Slavery Society began bringing out annually in The illustrations from 3 of those are available here: (which focuses on the horrors of slavery in the South); (which focuses on.

Book/Printed Material Image 1 of Illustrations of the American anti-slavery almanac for [New York, New York] Illustrations of the American anti-slavery almanac for [New York, New York] Duke University centennial celebration Trinity College- Duke University Preliminary program of the centennial.

As for the data itself, the American Anti-Slavery Almanac is a collection of Abolitionist pamphlets published in Boston between compiled into one almanac. The physical almanac is located at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books.

The abolitionist press, centered in northern states like New York and Massachusetts, produced and sold many almanacs that featured provocative cover illustrations depicting the brutality of slavery.

Beginning in the s, some people began to speak out against slavery. Colored scholars excluded from schools. Collection. The American anti-slavery almanac. Dates / Origin Date Issued: - Place: Boston Publisher: Webster & Southard Date Issued: Library locations Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division Shelf locator: Sc Rare A Topics.

Anti-Slavery collection (approximat pieces). In the late 's, the family of William Lloyd Garrison, along with others closely involved in the anti-slavery movement, presented the library with a major gathering of correspondence, documents, and other original material relating to the abolitionist cause from until after the Civil War.

American anti-slavery almanac, for being the third after leap-year, and the 63d of American independence: calculated for New York: adapted to the northern. The Old American Comic Almanac Published By S.

Dickinson, Boston American Anti-slavery Almanac For - Many Woodcuts Boston Almanac Railroad Postal Antique Book. The American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS; –) was an abolitionist society founded by William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur Tappan.

Frederick Douglass, an escaped slave, was a key leader of this society who often spoke at its meetings. William Wells Brown was also a freed slave who often spoke at meetings. Bythe society had 1, local chapters with aroundmembers.

The American Anti-Slavery Almanac for New York, NY & Boston, MA, This almanac presents the expected charts and tables, including lists of eclipses, high tides, population statistics of the United States, and postage rates.

The American Anti-Slavery Almanac, forpage 22 American Anti-Slavery Society The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History New York, NY, United States. Illustrations depict the horrors of slavery. Published for the Anti-Slavery Society by S. Benedict. Details. “A Northern Freeman Enslaved by Northern Hands” from The American Anti-Slavery Almanac, In the decades before the Civil War a clandestine network of human traffickers and slave traders stole away thousands of free African Americans from the northern states in.

The American Anti-Slavery Almanac, forVol. 1: Being the First After Bissextile or Leap-Year, and the 61st of American Independence, Adapted to Most Parts of the United States by. American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, Summary Theodore Dwight Weld (), a prominent abolitionist and reformer, was born in Hampton, Connecticut.

This short children's book was written and published by R.G. Williams for the American Anti-Slavery Society in New York in By this time there was a large amount of literature created by the various benevolent societies aimed at young people.

They all attempted to blend moral teachings with entertainment and education. Anti-slavery Society [etc., ??]), by American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (page images at HathiTrust) An almanack for the year of our Lord Calculated for the longitude of degr.

and elevation of the pole Arctick 42 degr. & 30 min. & may generally serve for the most part of New England, Cambridge,by Samuel. “Gateway to Freedom,” a book about the Underground Railroad by Eric Foner, began with the notebook of an abolitionist editor, Sydney Howard Gay.

American Anti-Slavery Almanac. THE AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY ALMANAC, FOR Boston, Published by N. Southard & D.K. Hitchcock, Drake24ll (48pp) as called for, is a fine copy with some foxing. This is an almanac with all the proper calendar pages and ephemeris information, but it is also an abolitionist propaganda publication.

The American Anti-Slavery Almanac for New York, NY & Boston, MA, This almanac presents the expected charts and tables, including lists of eclipses, high tides, population statistics of the United States, and postage rates.Illustrated anti-slavery almanac with extensive slavery and abolitionist content.

Illustrations within include a scene depicting slave shackles hanging from a tree and a black man preaching entitled “Consequences of Emancipation” and a contrasting horrific depiction of a Missouri slave mother killing her own children with an axe rather than letting them be sold as slaves.